The Crime of Modern Day Slavery on the High Seas

(Picture Credit: New York Times) By Andrew Elliott Cha The Tariff Act of 1930 in the United States precludes the purchase of goods made from forced labor. One would expect that this piece of legislation not only comports with American values, but also incentivizes producers to comply with international norms regarding labor practices. Nothing could … Continue reading The Crime of Modern Day Slavery on the High Seas

After Landmark Human Rights Ruling, Ireland Reconsiders Its Abortion Ban

By Bojana Stoparic Remarkable changes are afoot in Ireland: a government-appointed citizens’ commission seems poised to recommend pivotal reforms that would liberalize the country’s near-total ban on abortion. Ireland is a country where the anti-choice movement has remained fierce and powerful even as the rest of the world moves towards decriminalizing abortion and the Eighth Amendment … Continue reading After Landmark Human Rights Ruling, Ireland Reconsiders Its Abortion Ban

Sterilizing Sex Workers and Homeless Drug Addicts: A Policy to Help or to Harm?

By Azadeh Pourzand On January 1, 2017, an Iranian official called for the sterilization of sex workers and homeless drug addicts in Iran’s capital city, Tehran. The official, Siavash Shahrivar, the head of the Social and Cultural Affairs Department in Tehran Governorate, introduced this recommendation as a policy that would prevent social harm. Emphasizing that … Continue reading Sterilizing Sex Workers and Homeless Drug Addicts: A Policy to Help or to Harm?

How Rex Tillerson’s Exxon Bankrolled African Kleptocracy

By Tom O'Bryan Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has raised eyebrows for his cozy relationship with Russia's Vladimir Putin.  But the former CEO of ExxonMobil has also faced criticism for his company's support for Equatorial Guinea's authoritarian leader Teodoro Obiang - the world's longest-serving president, in power since 1979. Tutu Alicante, the Executive Director of EG Justice, has accused Tillerson … Continue reading How Rex Tillerson’s Exxon Bankrolled African Kleptocracy

Why We Need to Stop Talking About “Ethnic” Conflict

By Matthew Willmore The atrocities in Rwanda, we are often told, were an ethnic conflict: a genocide that not only fell along racial lines, but one fueled by intractable differences separating two distinct peoples. Indeed, much coverage from 1994 onward implied a degree of inevitability to the world’s fastest genocide. After all, "ethnic tensions [had] … Continue reading Why We Need to Stop Talking About “Ethnic” Conflict

How to Obtain and Preserve Marriage Equality

By Andy Vo I've been thinking a lot about marriage. Not because I’ve found true love, but because more and more countries have considered marriage equality in the second half of 2016. Last month, Gibraltar unanimously passed a bill recognizing marriage equality. Taiwan may become the first in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage as early … Continue reading How to Obtain and Preserve Marriage Equality

Demolition is Not the Answer

Refugees in France are left stranded when Calais camp is destroyed By Sarah Angell The French government’s policy to remove informal settlements of migrants and refugees without providing alternative housing for residents puts vulnerable people into dangerous positions. The French government needs to deliver viable housing alternatives for residents of camps if they want to … Continue reading Demolition is Not the Answer

Human Rights Violations Remain Worrying in Post-Nuclear Iran

By Azadeh Pourzand Iran sealed a nuclear deal with the United States and other world powers (P5+1) in July 2015. Many human rights defenders who followed the negotiations believed that a less isolated Iran would have more incentives to respect human rights. Others feared that Iran would now get away with human rights violations more than … Continue reading Human Rights Violations Remain Worrying in Post-Nuclear Iran

Engendering Networks of Resistance in Morocco

By Brittany Landorf  In 2010-2011, the Arab Spring witnessed a burgeoning female presence in an unprecedented manner. In Morocco, women cyber activists arose at the height of the 2011 protests; their voices continue to reverberate today. Virtual spaces facilitated the growth of these new movements and networks of activism. While much has been written about … Continue reading Engendering Networks of Resistance in Morocco

FIFA’s Commitment to Human Rights Tested

By Bojana Stoparic Can an international sports organization be held accountable for human rights violations that occur as a result of its events? In October, the Netherlands Trade Union Confederation (FNV) raised this question when it filed a lawsuit against Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the international soccer federation, in a Swiss court. The … Continue reading FIFA’s Commitment to Human Rights Tested